Tag Archives: Archbishop Jose Gomez

A Christian Voice In A Changing Culture

Injustice for All

‘Protecting our neighbors from unjust discrimination does not require redefining human nature.’ Archbishop Jose Gomez, President of US Bishops Congress.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of America violated the meaning of sexual identity by broadening it to include persons who LGBT+ identify. Our highest Court did so by amending a 1964 Civil Rights Act designed to protect workers of all races, religions and both men and women, namely the latter due to misogynistic policies, from job discrimination. Now men who ‘feel’ like women are legally recognized on par with women. America just divorced sexuality from the body. We feel, therefore we are.

America just redefined sex. Gone are the days when we assumed male and female had meaning, dignity, some intrinsic value tied to creating and protecting new life. The 1964 Act defended that meaning by insisting that women not be excluded from fair treatment on the job. Any person at odds with his or her sexual birthright was considered in need of clinical and spiritual help, not legal status.

Well, you say, haven’t we already been through this when the Court sanctioned ‘gay’ marriage in 2015? Kind of. But that involved only same-sex friends who want to ‘play house.’ Redefining any figment of one’s fractured imagination as a protected minority is far more dangerous than ‘gay’ marriage.

How so? In redefining human nature, the Court legalizes human unhappiness. Our freedom hinges on aligning ourselves with Reality. Reality includes sexual birthright. I may feel many things about my sex: empowered, oppressed, lusty, anxious, splendid, empty, proud, etc.; my peace rests on integrating the truth that my body is either male or female and there is no other! To grant ‘feelings’ the power to cancel out who we in truth are is nothing short of sexual suicide.

J.K. Rowlings elucidates this well. (and has taken huge hits for doing so). As one intent on empowering women, she points out that females who ‘transition’ alter their bodies irrevocably and cannot reclaim their fertility once they seek to ‘de-transition’ as many do. She cites the faddish ‘social contagion’ of the trans-phenomenon, and the truth that most young people who feel at odds with their sex pass through dysphoria unto making peace with ‘birth’ bodies.

Her main concern? Women’s well-being. The very Civil Rights Act that sought to protect women now endangers them. ‘When you throw open the doors of bathrooms and changing rooms to any man who believe he is a woman, then you open the door to any and all men who wish to come inside.’

America just opened that door. Unhappiness, injustice for all.

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Breaking Water

When Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles opened our Truth and Love Conference last week, his words about how we participate in Jesus’ baptism brought this to mind. C.S. Lewis describes a diver breaking the water’s surface then descending into the depths to retrieve treasure from the ocean floor. He breaks the water once more in ascent, joyfully holding out his ‘catch’ for the world to see. So Jesus reclaims our true natures as the Father’s beloved sons and daughters from the depths of enslavement (Gal. 4:3-7; Rom. 8:15-18). In so doing, He reveals His glorious mercy through grateful children.

I marveled at the Archbishop’s clarity; due to Jesus’ baptism (and baptism of suffering of Calvary), we who were slaves to the world’s system of defining ourselves can be free and shining expressions of the Father’s design. He cleared the way for people like me who experience same-sex attraction to forego all worldly claims (LGBTQ, etc.) upon our identities. Instead, we can settle deeply into the truth of who we are as children of the Father who delights in engaging with us in order to impart what we need to grow into maturity.

No small or easy thing, this baptism of Jesus and our own which makes all things new. The stakes are huge, for us and for others; in a world that invites persons made in His image to create their own ‘gender’ reality, we uphold a deeper truth of the Father’s claim upon His children. Let’s start 2017 by actively engaging with our own baptism and the Father’s will for our sonship and daughterhood. Toward that end, I would encourage you to:

Behold the Lamb; we become what we behold. Turn off your screens (after you read this of course) and be still before the Crucified. It helps to simply gaze upon the Cross, which conveys in an instant the watery death He died and His ascent. In the Cross lies all that we need to know: the Son won back for us our true selves. Gazing on the Beloved mediates who we are as beloved children.

Devour Scripture; we become what we eat. Meditate on verses that summon who He is and who we are. The aforementioned passages from St. Paul are a good starting point, as is Song of Songs, a love letter from the Father to His kids. Open the Book and let it permeate you. I memorize key verses so I can summon the truth at hard moments in the day.

Listen to the Father’s voice; we become what we hear. Turn off devices and be still. Listen in quiet to what He wants to say; His sheep hear His voice (JN 10:3). Don’t worry if at first all you hear is clutter. He loves your effort and will honor it. Quiet your heart in the Spirit of Jesus who upon breaking the water heard: ‘This is My beloved Son with whom I am well-pleased’ (Matt. 3:17). You please Him; He loves you, His child.

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