Category: Prayer

A Christian Voice In A Changing Culture

Just and True

Justice means we give others what is due them. Disagreement need not skew a reasonable evaluation of others; justice demands we strive for objectivity so we can honor what is honorable in our fellow humanity.

Justice has stumbled in the streets, as mobs morph from demanding fair treatment of African Americans to destroying honorable signposts of our history.

On this Feast Day of St. Junipero Serra—the Apostle of California—I just witnessed his statue being lassoed, toppled, and smashed by protesters in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Not only have the bullied become the bullies, they now seek to edit American history by destroying any symbol that disturbs them.

We must insist on justice. Irrational and ignorant vandalism have no place in a just culture. Justice demands we give our forefathers their due, whether we agree with their legacy or not.

The mob ruled Franciscan Serra a bigot for bringing Christianity to California in the mid-18th century. He trekked on foot from Mexico City to San Francisco and established missions along the way to serve the native peoples. (Many of the missions are still active churches where I have fasted and prayed for California.) Over 6000 persons were baptized into the Church through his efforts. Did he enslave native Americans of the West Coast, as the mob insists?

Absolutely not. Though no-one today would advocate for the two-pronged advance of evangelization and Spanish political conquest, Serra disdained the latter. Backbreaking travel and labor—supported by an ulcerated leg—were eclipsed by his biggest conflict, the interference by the Spanish military state on his efforts to convert and disciple native peoples.

Various biographies clarify: the sword that pierced Serra’s heart was military cruelty of his sheep. Like a good shepherd, he constantly fought Spanish officials for freedom from arbitrary and cruel acts upon his people. He succeeded at ensuring that the presidios, or military barracks, were stationed as far from the missions as possible.

To be sure, he labored in a flawed system that lanced him more deeply than any cross-cultural challenge. Pierced, he loved his people well, pouring out the heart of Jesus for California. Perhaps many oppose him because they at core oppose the Gospel. But one cannot dispute his heroic sacrifice, and how his self-giving laid the basis for California’s thriving, diverse Christian culture.

To deface him is to act as unjustly as the arbitrary violence imposed on native Californians by the Spanish military in Serra’s day.

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Birthright

June ends with unabated clamoring for justice. Pent up by social isolation, an army of protesters vents in streets and squares. Equality, NOW! Lit by the murder of George Floyd, we face African Americans entrenched in attitudes and structures that are at best oppressive. The steely gaze illumines our complicity.

Behind banners of Black Lives Matter fly rainbow flags. Straining to draw parallels between empowering an ethnic group enslaved once and still by myriad tyrants, LGBT+ activists clamor for social recognition. Heterosexism replaces white privilege as the enemy. And America answers with the biggest victory yet for the sexually ‘diverse’—a court ruling two weeks ago that redefined sexual nature as whatever one thinks and feels it to be.

Persons still inclined to reason amid the clamor may wonder why the two strains of protest—one seeking freedom from insidious slavery, the other for enslaving lives with a host of ‘selves’ that result in sexual suicide—can peacefully intermingle. In truth, they cannot. The answer is simple and radical, rooted in our Creator. We are born male and female. Human happiness lies in making peace with our bodies and in overcoming attitudes and behaviors to the contrary. African Americans are born and blessed by God with an ethnicity that commands full rights and privileges on par with any other race. Dignity demands reason: it directs us to clear out any shadow cast on one’s ethnic birthright and on one’s sexual birthright.

As for the latter, at risk of offending Gaga, you were not born that way. You just lost your way in a pandemic of sexual confusion fanned by the Supreme Court.

Around the corner from me is Troost, an 11-mile avenue that demarks the institutionalized racism of my town, Kansas City, the ninth most segregated city in the USA. 2000 of us prayed there last week to repent of how we contributed to the Troost wound, a street that divides blacks from whites in a shameful historic effort to fund good white neighborhoods and schools and to let African Americans work it out for themselves. West of Troost are tony tidy homes; eastward lie mostly African American neighborhoods which struggle for equality and opportunity. Two of my kids live and teach in schools there. They embody the truth that overcoming racism takes more than a prayer. They work to help African Americans recover the dignity of their birthright.

Just after the Troost prayer, I left for our training in Kansas City Kansas where 60 brave persons gathered to reclaim the beauty and power of their birthright, made in His image as male or female. Jesus loves that. He comes quickly for persons seeking to become who the Father made them to be. Amid the clamor for justice, we need each other more than ever to stay true. Our confusion should be clearer than ever. When we lump justice for ethnic birthright with empowering sexually broken ‘selves’, we trivialize the real wound still bleeding in African-Americans and further distance the LGBT+ set from making peace with their birthright.

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Collective Burden, Personal Transformation

Abbey Foard, Executive Director of DSM/LW

Our nation (and our world) is swirling, as dizzying news cycles attest. No need to recount—we are living them. For those of us sensitive to “feeling” our communities, the intensity can feel like a riptide, a fierce pull away from the shoreline into unstable waters.

In this sensitivity, we can risk interpreting our world too personally. When I do this, I risk condemning myself and others. We can also risk depersonalizing these global realities by refusing responsibility for neighbor and brother. We may lurch from super-responsibility, as though the weight of every life rests upon our shoulders, to shirking responsibility entirely. When we do this, we numb our call to be salt and light—stabilizing forces amid upheaval.

I believe God is provoking His Church (you and me personally) to awaken and find the narrow way. He invites us to re-engage with Him so we can share His heart and carry His burden—a collective burden—for the world He loves and the people He yearns to make His own.

He is calling us to neither harden our hearts nor grow weary in well-doing but to be healed, both personally and collectively. He wants this collective burden to personalize into deeper transformation at core areas of our lives.

We must respond to His invitation in real-time. That means giving Him room to sensitize us to His conviction. Might we take time to heed His call to shift and sort what needs reordering in our lives? That requires humility and surrender in ways we have not yet known. Yet Jesus came to do this deep work. Seasons like this expose our need for it.

In His book, The Bible and Homosexual Practice (2001), Robert Gagnon speaks of Jesus’ attitudes around healing and transformation. When Jesus encountered sexual sinners, exploitive tax collectors, and the like, He did not hesitate to direct them to a narrow way. Healing was more than a 280-character tweet; it was a life-altering change. For Jesus, “Healing implies transformation; transformation implies repentance [and] without reform of one’s prior sinful conduct there can be no recovery” (p. 211).

We ought not move through times like this without personal and collective reform, repentance unto transformation and healing. No part of our individual life is excluded—our Church and world cannot change until we do. And because of that, I believe that individual transformation matters most to Jesus.

At Desert Stream, we invite each person into this personal transformation. We are unpopular, as we insist that Jesus transforms deep sexual and relational brokenness. We proclaim what we have seen and experienced. We know the freedom and challenge of living out our reform. Whatever way the swirls of 2020 are hitting us, may you and I respond with a “yes” to the transformation that Jesus seeks to do in each of us.

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Sacred Heart, Living Stream

I write this on the Feast Day of Jesus’ Sacred Heart: His generous love for each human being revealed in His pierced heart pouring out all we need to be free. Jesus’ Sacred Heart distills the meaning of mercy—so deep yet so simple that a child could behold His lovely face and wounded heart and know somehow that every tear can find its end in His embrace.

You are reading this on the third day of our Living Waters Training here in Kansas City. We are doing it: 60 brave souls turned off their computers and re-entered the land of the living. We gather through and for His Sacred Heart; we position ourselves before His river of Divine Mercy and welcome the flood that cleanses and the healing Presence that restores us as we offer His gifts to one another.

I can say without exaggeration that His Sacred Heart is our focus. The Church rightly identifies Jesus’ heart as the ‘chief sign and symbol of that love with which the Divine Redeemer loves all human beings without exception’ (CCC #478). O, how He loves us. We position our divided, parched hearts before His, pulsating with mercy for us. The Blood speaks a better Word and silences the din that might otherwise drown out His still small voice of Love. Speak Lord, Your servants are listening! Neither virus nor riot, war nor rumors of war, bad court rulings nor yellow journalists, will separate us from Love.

Real life has stripped us of self-reliance. We flee into the folds of His Sacred Heart, pierced for us: You Jesus, assuming our suffering and imparting the consolation only You can give. Divine Mercy is like a magnet that compels us to name every sin, every wound, every hardening part of us that needs to be made tender and new in His healing flood.

Our aim is not small. If we can discover afresh the Love that changes everything, then we can give that love away. We can heal others. As wounded healers, we serve the broken ever mindful of our weaknesses. Yes, He contains and sustains us, and He does so in the full light of what is still being healed. We dare not venture out from His heart. Only in union with Him do we offer others the mercy that frees every heart inclined toward His.

Jesus’ Sacred Heart is always inclined toward ours. That is our hope, the Source of ‘Living Waters’. Please pray for us! May His heart enlarge ours and release through us a river of mercy that will change the world, one grateful sinner at a time.

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Prayerfully Fight for Living Waters (Torrents de Vie/TDV) in the French-Speaking World!

Over 25-years-ago, a CA woman prophesied that Living Waters would find extraordinary expression in France. Her words came true. Founders Werner and Charlotte and new leaders Claude and Monique have led thousands of French-speakers (France, Switzerland, French Guyana, other territories) into pools of life-transforming mercy. They have been persecuted unlike any other expression of Living Waters. Pray for their courage as hostile cultural forces seek to destroy them.

Claude writes:

The Lord calls us to face many challenges, external and internal.

-A bill is advancing in the French National Assembly ‘prohibits practices aimed at changing a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity.’ The govt.’s goal? To close TDV Werner Loertscher and similar associations.

-A variety of journalists have infiltrated our healing sessions. The last one resulted in the publication of a book scandalizing TDV, particularly Werner Loertscher. Gay lobbyists waged a virulent press war against us that made big news in the French media for months.

-More and more churches are destabilized in their positions in the face of homosexuality. The retreat center which sponsors our training canceled our reservation due to fear of demonstrations.

-Pray for our leaders’ fortitude; many feel abused and insecure. One local group closed.

-Pray for us as we work on unifying and renewing our teams.

-Pray for fresh coordinators with clear vision who can strengthen others and launch new groups.

-Pray for our ‘Summer University’ designed to restore team members and to grow in the basics of spiritual combat. We created a ‘Spiritual Coaching Training’ to equip new team members.

-We are creating a website designed to defend our positions and to educate parliamentarians.

Pray for us to be courageous, in the spirit of Paul’s exhortation in Philippians 1:27–30: ‘to fight with one heart for the faith of the gospel, without being frightened in any way by those who oppose us.’

Thank you for prayerfully standing with us!

On behalf of the TDV team,

Claude RIESS

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